• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for September 3, 2020

Thursday in the Week of Proper 17

Evening Prayer

September 3, 2020


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Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.


Note: We are praying using Rite II (contemporary English) language, as is our normal pattern at St. Matthew's. It reminds us that we can speak to God with our ordinary, everyday language. This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979) and other liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.




Evening Prayer, Rite II

[BCP, p. 116]



Jesus said, "I am the light of the world; whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life."

[John 8:12; BCP, p. 116]



Confession of Sin

[BCP, p. 116]


Let us confess our sins against God and our neighbor.


Most merciful God,

we confess that we have sinned against you

in thought, word, and deed,

by what we have done,

and by what we have left undone.

We have not loved you with our whole heart;

we have not loved our neighbors as ourselves.

We are truly sorry and we humbly repent.

For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ,

have mercy on us and forgive us;

that we may delight in your will,

and walk in your ways,

to the glory of your Name. Amen.


The Officiant says the following (a Priest substitutes "you" for "us")


Almighty God have mercy on [us], forgive [us] all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen [us] in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep [us] in eternal life. Amen.



The Invitatory and Psalter

[BCP, p. 117]


V: O God, make speed to save us. R: O Lord, make haste to help us.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.

Alleluia!


O Gracious Light

[BCP, p. 118]


O gracious light, pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven, O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed!

Now as we come to the setting of the sun, and our eyes behold the vesper light, we sing your praises, O God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

You are worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices, O Son of God, O Giver of life, and to be glorified through all the worlds.


The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 37: Part II

[BCP, p. 634]


19   The LORD cares for the lives of the godly, *

and their inheritance shall last for ever.

20   They shall not be ashamed in bad times, *

and in days of famine they shall have enough.

21   As for the wicked, they shall perish, *

and the enemies of the LORD, like the glory of the meadows, shall vanish; they shall vanish like smoke.

22   The wicked borrow and do not repay, *

but the righteous are generous in giving.

23   Those who are blessed by God shall possess the land, *

but those who are cursed by him shall be destroyed.

24   Our steps are directed by the LORD; *

he strengthens those in whose way he delights.

25   If they stumble, they shall not fall headlong, *

for the LORD holds them by the hand.

26   I have been young and now I am old, *

but never have I seen the righteous forsaken, or their children begging bread.

27   The righteous are always generous in their lending, *

and their children shall be a blessing.

28   Turn from evil, and do good, *

and dwell in the land for ever.

29   For the LORD loves justice; *

he does not forsake his faithful ones.

30   They shall be kept safe for ever, *

but the offspring of the wicked shall be destroyed.

31   The righteous shall possess the land *

and dwell in it for ever.

32   The mouth of the righteous utters wisdom, *

and their tongue speaks what is right.

33   The law of their God is in their heart, *

and their footsteps shall not falter.

34   The wicked spy on the righteous *

and seek occasion to kill them.

35   The LORD will not abandon them to their hand, *

nor let them be found guilty when brought to trial.

36   Wait upon the LORD and keep his way; *

he will raise you up to possess the land, and when the wicked are cut off, you will see it.

37   I have seen the wicked in their arrogance, *

flourishing like a tree in full leaf.

38   I went by, and behold, they were not there; *

I searched for them, but they could not be found.

39   Mark those who are honest; observe the upright; *

for there is a future for the peaceable.

40   Transgressors shall be destroyed, one and all; *

the future of the wicked is cut off.

41   But the deliverance of the righteous comes from the LORD; *

he is their stronghold in time of trouble.

42   The LORD will help them and rescue them; *

he will rescue them from the wicked and deliver them, because they seek refuge in him.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons


A reading from John (9:1-17)


As he walked along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, "Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?" Jesus answered, "Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God's works might be revealed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world." When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man's eyes, saying to him, "Go, wash in the pool of Siloam" (which means Sent). Then he went and washed and came back able to see. The neighbors and those who had seen him before as a beggar began to ask, "Is this not the man who used to sit and beg?" Some were saying, "It is he." Others were saying, "No, but it is someone like him." He kept saying, "I am the man." But they kept asking him, "Then how were your eyes opened?" He answered, "The man called Jesus made mud, spread it on my eyes, and said to me, 'Go to Siloam and wash.' Then I went and washed and received my sight." They said to him, "Where is he?" He said, "I do not know." They brought to the Pharisees the man who had formerly been blind. Now it was a sabbath day when Jesus made the mud and opened his eyes. Then the Pharisees also began to ask him how he had received his sight. He said to them, "He put mud on my eyes. Then I washed, and now I see." Some of the Pharisees said, "This man is not from God, for he does not observe the sabbath." But others said, "How can a man who is a sinner perform such signs?" And they were divided. So they said again to the blind man, "What do you say about him? It was your eyes he opened." He said, "He is a prophet."


The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.


The Song of Mary

[BCP, p. 119; Luke 1:46-55]


My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; * for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant. From this day all generations will call me blessed: * the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name. He has mercy on those who fear him * in every generation. He has shown the strength of his arm, * he has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, * and has lifted up the lowly. He has filled the hungry with good things, * and the rich he has sent away empty. He has come to the help of his servant Israel, * for he has remembered his promise of mercy, The promise he made to our fathers, * to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


A Reading from "non-biblical Christian literature" [OPTIONAL]

[BCP, p. 142]


The Song of Simeon

[BCP, p. 120; Luke 2:29-32]


Lord, you now have set your servant free *

to go in peace as you have promised;

For these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, *

whom you have prepared for all the world to see:

A Light to enlighten the nations, *

and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.


The Apostles' Creed

[BCP, p. 120]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, his only son, our Lord.

He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit

and born of the Virgin Mary.

He suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried.

He descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again.

He ascended into heaven,

and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[BCP, p. 121]


V: The Lord be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.


Suffrages B

[BCP, p. 122]


That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That your holy angels may lead us in paths of peace and goodwill,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be pardoned and forgiven for our sins and offenses,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That there may be peace to your Church and to the whole world,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may depart this life in your faith and fear, and not be condemned before the great judgment seat of Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be bound together by your Holy Spirit in the communion of Blessed Mary the Bearer of God, Blessed Matthew our patron, Blessed Phoebe and Blessed Prudence whom we commemorate today, and all your saints, entrusting one another and all our life to Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


Collect of the Day: Proper 17

[BCP, p. 233]


Lord of all power and might, the author and giver of all good things: Graft in our hearts the love of your Name; increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and bring forth in us the fruit of good works; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: St. Phoebe, Deacon (d. 1st Century CE)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 384 (pre-publication)]


Eternal God, who raised up Phoebe as a deacon in your church and minister of your Gospel; Grant us that same grace that, assisted by her prayers and example, we too may take the Gospel to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: Prudence Crandall, Teacher and Prophetic Witness (d. 1890)

[A Great Cloud of Witnesses, 2015, p. 426]


God, the wellspring of justice and strength: We thank you for raising up in Prudence Crandall a belief in education and a resolute will to teach girls of every color and race, that, alongside her, they might take their place in working for the nurture and well-being of all society, undaunted by prejudice or adversity. Grant that we, following her example, may participate in the work of building up the human family in Christ, your Word and Wisdom; who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


A Collect for the Presence of Christ

[BCP, p. 124]


Lord Jesus, stay with us, for evening is at hand and the day is past; be our companion in the way, kindle our hearts, and awaken hope, that we may know you as you are revealed in Scripture and the breaking of bread. Grant this for the sake of your love. Amen.


Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.


Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.


The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.


A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.


The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Thanks be to God.


The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit, be with us all evermore. Amen. (2 Corinthians 13:14)



About Today's Commemoration(s)


September 3: St. Phoebe, Deacon (d. 1st Century CE)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 383 (pre-publication)]


Phoebe appears once in Paul’s letter to the Romans, (16:1) where she is referred to as both a deacon in the church at Cenchreae, near Corinth, and a benefactor of Paul and others.


The fact that Paul commends her to the Roman church at the end of the letter suggests the possibility that she was the messenger, which would speak highly of Paul’s trust in her. There may even have been more to her mission, as Paul commands the Christians in Rome to help her in whatever she needs.


It is unknown what other impact she had in the early church, but she is an example of the many early workers who supported Paul in the spreading of the Gospel, often personally carrying that message across the Empire. We may often think that Paul did it all himself, or at least with the help of only a few of the more prominent individuals such as Luke. But the brief mention of Phoebe gives us an example of the many women and men whose calling was to work faithfully in the background to ensure that the gospel would spread throughout the world.


September 3: Prudence Crandall, Teacher and Prophetic Witness (d. 1890)

[A Great Cloud of Witnesses, 2015, p. 425]


Born to a Quaker family in Rhode Island in 1803, Prudence Crandall was educated in arithmetic, the sciences, and Latin at the New England Friends’ Boarding School in Rhode Island. The Religious Society of Friends, or “Quakers,” believed that women should be educated, and it was in the environment of the Friends’ Boarding School that Prudence Crandall's passion for teaching was first awakened.


In 1831, Crandall started a girl’s school in Canterbury, Connecticut, where she educated the daughters of the town’s wealthy families. In 1833 she admitted to her school a young African American girl named Sarah Harris, who wanted an education so that she could in turn teach other African American children. The parents of the white children at Crandall’s school were outraged and demanded Harris’s expulsion, but Crandall refused and decided to open a new school for African American girls.


Despite repeated attempts by town members to close the school, and even threats to destroy it, Crandall persevered in her labors. She enlisted the help of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of The Liberator, the nation’s major antislavery newspaper. Through his paper and advocacy, Garrison spread awareness of her cause all over the nation.


However, later in 1833, the state legislature passed the so-called “Black Law,” which made it a crime to open a school that taught African American children from any state other than Connecticut. Crandall, who had received pupils from other states, was arrested, jailed, and tried. She was eventually convicted, but a higher court reversed the decision. Far from subsiding, the harassment she endured grew worse, and, fearing for the safety of her students, she closed her school in 1834, and settled with her husband in LaSalle County, Illinois, on a farm. She opened a school there, and worked for Women’s Suffrage and the Temperance movement.


After her husband died in 1874, Crandall moved to Elk Falls, Kansas. In 1886 a petition endorsed by Mark Twain and signed by more than a hundred citizens of that state, expressing their regret and shame over her treatment, persuaded the Connecticut state legislature to award her a pension. Prudence Crandall died in 1890, and today she is recognized as the official State Heroine of Connecticut.

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