• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for September 15, 2020

Tuesday in the Week of Proper 19

Evening Prayer

September 15, 2020


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Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.


Note: We are praying using Rite II (contemporary English) language, as is our normal pattern at St. Matthew's. It reminds us that we can speak to God with our ordinary, everyday language. This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979) and other liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.




Evening Prayer, Rite II

[BCP, p. 116]



Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ

[Philippians 1:2; BCP, p. 115]



Confession of Sin

[BCP, p. 116]


Let us confess our sins against God and our neighbor. Most merciful God, we confess that we have sinned against you in thought, word, and deed, by what we have done, and by what we have left undone. We have not loved you with our whole heart; we have not loved our neighbors as ourselves. We are truly sorry and we humbly repent.

For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ,

have mercy on us and forgive us;

that we may delight in your will,

and walk in your ways,

to the glory of your Name. Amen.


The Officiant says the following (a Priest substitutes "you" for "us")


Almighty God have mercy on [us], forgive [us] all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen [us] in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep [us] in eternal life. Amen.



The Invitatory and Psalter

[BCP, p. 117]


V: O God, make speed to save us. R: O Lord, make haste to help us.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.

Alleluia!


O Gracious Light

[BCP, p. 118]


O gracious light, pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven, O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed!

Now as we come to the setting of the sun, and our eyes behold the vesper light, we sing your praises, O God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

You are worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices, O Son of God, O Giver of life, and to be glorified through all the worlds.


The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 68

[BCP, p. 676]


  Let God arise, and let his enemies be scattered; *

let those who hate him flee before him.

  Let them vanish like smoke when the wind drives it away; *

as the wax melts at the fire, so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.

  But let the righteous be glad and rejoice before God; *

let them also be merry and joyful.

  Sing to God, sing praises to his Name; exalt him who rides upon the heavens; *

YAHWEH is his Name, rejoice before him!

  Father of orphans, defender of widows, *

God in his holy habitation!

  God gives the solitary a home and brings forth prisoners into freedom; *

but the rebels shall live in dry places.

  O God, when you went forth before your people, *

when you marched through the wilderness,

  The earth shook, and the skies poured down rain, at the presence of God, the God of Sinai, *

at the presence of God, the God of Israel.

  You sent a gracious rain, O God, upon your inheritance; *

you refreshed the land when it was weary.

10   Your people found their home in it; *

in your goodness, O God, you have made provision for the poor.

11   The Lord gave the word; *

great was the company of women who bore the tidings:

12   Kings with their armies are fleeing away; *

the women at home are dividing the spoils.

13   Though you lingered among the sheepfolds, *

you shall be like a dove whose wings are covered with silver, whose feathers are like green gold.

14   When the Almighty scattered kings, *

it was like snow falling in Zalmon.

15   O mighty mountain, O hill of Bashan! *

O rugged mountain, O hill of Bashan!

16   Why do you look with envy, O rugged mountain, at the hill which God chose for his resting place? *

truly, the LORD will dwell there for ever.

17   The chariots of God are twenty thousand, even thousands of thousands; *

the Lord comes in holiness from Sinai.

18   You have gone up on high and led captivity captive; you have received gifts even from your enemies, *

that the LORD God might dwell among them.

19   Blessed be the Lord day by day, *

the God of our salvation, who bears our burdens.

20   He is our God, the God of our salvation; *

God is the LORD, by whom we escape death.

21   God shall crush the heads of his enemies, *

and the hairy scalp of those who go on still in their wickedness.

22   The Lord has said, "I will bring them back from Bashan; *

I will bring them back from the depths of the sea;

23   That your foot may be dipped in blood, *

the tongues of your dogs in the blood of your enemies."

24   They see your procession, O God, *

your procession into the sanctuary, my God and my King.

25   The singers go before, musicians follow after, *

in the midst of maidens playing upon the hand-drums.

26   Bless God in the congregation; *

bless the LORD, you that are of the fountain of Israel.

27   There is Benjamin, least of the tribes, at the head; the princes of Judah in a company; *

and the princes of Zebulon and Naphtali.

28   Send forth your strength, O God; *

establish, O God, what you have wrought for us.

29   Kings shall bring gifts to you, *

for your temple's sake at Jerusalem.

30   Rebuke the wild beast of the reeds, *

and the peoples, a herd of wild bulls with its calves.

31   Trample down those who lust after silver; *

scatter the peoples that delight in war.

32   Let tribute be brought out of Egypt; *

let Ethiopia stretch out her hands to God.

33   Sing to God, O kingdoms of the earth; *

sing praises to the Lord.

34   He rides in the heavens, the ancient heavens; *

he sends forth his voice, his mighty voice.

35   Ascribe power to God; *

his majesty is over Israel; his strength is in the skies.

36   How wonderful is God in his holy places! *

the God of Israel giving strength and power to his people! Blessed be God!


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons


A reading from John (12:9-19)


When the great crowd of the Jews learned that he was there, they came not only because of Jesus but also to see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. So the chief priests planned to put Lazarus to death as well, since it was on account of him that many of the Jews were deserting and were believing in Jesus. The next day the great crowd that had come to the festival heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, shouting, "Hosanna! Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord-- the King of Israel!" Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it; as it is written: "Do not be afraid, daughter of Zion. Look, your king is coming, sitting on a donkey's colt!" His disciples did not understand these things at first; but when Jesus was glorified, then they remembered that these things had been written of him and had been done to him. So the crowd that had been with him when he called Lazarus out of the tomb and raised him from the dead continued to testify. It was also because they heard that he had performed this sign that the crowd went to meet him. The Pharisees then said to one another, "You see, you can do nothing. Look, the world has gone after him!"


The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.


The Song of Mary

[BCP, p. 119; Luke 1:46-55]


My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; * for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant. From this day all generations will call me blessed: * the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name. He has mercy on those who fear him * in every generation. He has shown the strength of his arm, * he has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, * and has lifted up the lowly. He has filled the hungry with good things, * and the rich he has sent away empty. He has come to the help of his servant Israel, * for he has remembered his promise of mercy, The promise he made to our fathers, * to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


A Reading from "non-biblical Christian literature" [OPTIONAL]

[(BCP, p. 142)]


The Song of Simeon

[BCP, p. 120; Luke 2:29-32]


Lord, you now have set your servant free *

to go in peace as you have promised;

For these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, *

whom you have prepared for all the world to see:

A Light to enlighten the nations, *

and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.


The Apostles' Creed

[BCP, p. 120]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, his only son, our Lord.

He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit

and born of the Virgin Mary.

He suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried.

He descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again.

He ascended into heaven,

and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[BCP, p. 121]


V: The Lord be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.


Suffrages B

[BCP, p. 122]


That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That your holy angels may lead us in paths of peace and goodwill,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be pardoned and forgiven for our sins and offenses,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That there may be peace to your Church and to the whole world,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may depart this life in your faith and fear, and not be condemned before the great judgment seat of Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be bound together by your Holy Spirit in the communion of Blessed Mary the Bearer of God, Blessed Matthew our patron, Blessed Catherine and Blessed James, whom we commemorate today, and all your saints, entrusting one another and all our life to Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


Collect of the Day: Proper 19

[BCP, p. 233]


O God, because without you we are not able to please you, mercifully grant that your Holy Spirit may in all things direct and rule our hearts; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: Catherine of Genoa, Mystic and Nurse (d. 1510)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 406 (pre-publication)]


Gracious God, reveal to your church the depths of your love; that, like your servant Catherine of Genoa, we might give ourselves in loving service, knowing that we have been perfectly loved by you; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.


Collect of the Day: James Chisholm, Priest (d. 1855)

[A Great Cloud of Witnesses, 2015, p. 452]


Merciful God, you called your priest James Chisholm to sacrifice his life while working amid great suffering and death: Help us, like him, to live by the faith we profess, following in the footsteps of Jesus Christ our Lord; who with the Father and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, in glory everlasting. Amen.


A Collect for Aid against Perils

[BCP, p. 123]


Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.


Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.


Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.


The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.


A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.


The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Thanks be to God.


May the God of hope fill us with all joy and peace in believing through the power of the Holy Spirit. Amen. (Romans 15:13)



About Today's Commemoration(s)


September 15: Catherine of Genoa, Mystic and Nurse (d. 1510)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 405 (pre-publication)]


Catherine of Genoa is remembered both for her ministry of nursing the sick during repeated plagues, and also for the works that she wrote recounting her mystical experiences. Her writings became widely known when they were made the subject of Baron Friedrich von Hügel's classic work The Mystical Element of Religion (1908).


Catherine was born in Genoa, Italy, in 1447, the youngest of five children. As a teenager, Catherine wanted to become a nun, but her application to the convent was denied. Instead, she was married at the age of 16 to Giuliano Adorno as part of an attempt to end the feud between their two families. The couple were initially miserable together. Giuliano was angry, unfaithful, and lost most of their money through gambling and reckless spending. Catherine spent the first ten years of her marriage in a deep depression, praying that God would strike her with a great sickness so that she could remain in bed all day.


The trajectory of her life was changed on March 22, 1473 when she had a sudden mystical experience. While she was in church, in the middle of making her confession to a priest, she was suddenly struck with an overpowering sense of the overwhelming love of God. She was so stunned and dazed by this experience that she walked out of the church without even completing her confession. This was the beginning of a life of profound prayer.


Catherine combined a deep and intense contemplative life with an active dedication to caring for the sick in the local hospital. In time, her husband joined her in this work, and the couple became increasingly close to one another through their shared labor for those in need. They eventually moved together into the Pannatome, a large hospital in Genoa, in order to devote themselves completely to caring for the sick there. There Catherine also dictated a number of works of mystical theology, which were published some 40 years after her death.


Catherine insisted that God should be loved only for God’s self, and not for anything that one might expect to receive from him, insisting that “Pure Love loves God without any for.” She also wrote: “All that I have said is nothing compared to what I feel within, the witnessed correspondence of love between God and the soul; for when God sees the soul, as pure as it was in its origins, he tugs at it with a glance, draws it and binds it to himself with a fiery love that by itself could annihilate the immortal soul.”


She died on September 15th, 1510 while nursing the sick, and was buried in the hospital chapel.


September 15: James Chisholm, Priest (d. 1855)

[A Great Cloud of Witnesses, 2015, p. 451]


James Chisholm, born in 1815, was the rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, Virginia, when, in 1855, an aggressive yellow fever epidemic swept through tidewater Virginia. Many of the region’s wealthy citizens were able to escape the area to avoid exposure and fears of contamination. In most cases, the physicians and clergy who served them departed as well. This left the area’s poor bereft of doctors, caregivers, and, in some cases, the basic provisions of food and water to sustain life.


James Chisholm sent his family away to safety, staying behind to provide whatever care for the sick he could. Chisholm provided food, amateur medical assistance, and pastoral care. He was even known to have dug graves for those who had died.


As the ravages of the plague were beginning to subside, Chisholm, weary to the point of exhaustion from his faithful priestly service, contracted the fever, and died the same year.


An account of Chisholm’s sacrifice, written only months after his death, marvels at the inner strength that Chisholm discovered that enabled him to stay behind and serve the people, many of whom were only waiting to die. Before the crisis, Chisholm was described as having been retiring to the point of bashfulness, delicate, weak, and lacking much fortitude. When faced, however, with the call of these priestly duties in the face of great hardship, Chisholm showed a strength and courage few knew he possessed.


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