• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for November 24, 2020

Tuesday in the Week of Proper 29

Evening Prayer

November 24, 2020


Check out the live stream at 5:00 p.m. at www.FaceBook.com/StMattSav.


Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.


Note: We are praying using Rite II (contemporary English) language, as is our normal pattern at St. Matthew's. It reminds us that we can speak to God with our ordinary, everyday language. This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979) and other liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.




Evening Prayer, Rite II

[BCP, p. 116]



Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ

[Philippians 1:2; BCP, p. 115]



Confession of Sin

[BCP, p. 116]


Let us confess our sins against God and our neighbor. Most merciful God, we confess that we have sinned against you in thought, word, and deed, by what we have done, and by what we have left undone. We have not loved you with our whole heart; we have not loved our neighbors as ourselves. We are truly sorry and we humbly repent.

For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ,

have mercy on us and forgive us;

that we may delight in your will,

and walk in your ways,

to the glory of your Name. Amen.


The Officiant says the following (a Priest substitutes "you" for "us")


Almighty God have mercy on [us], forgive [us] all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen [us] in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep [us] in eternal life. Amen.



The Invitatory and Psalter

[BCP, p. 117]


V: O God, make speed to save us. R: O Lord, make haste to help us.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.

Alleluia!


O Gracious Light

[BCP, p. 118]


O gracious light, pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven, O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed!

Now as we come to the setting of the sun, and our eyes behold the vesper light, we sing your praises, O God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

You are worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices, O Son of God, O Giver of life, and to be glorified through all the worlds.


The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 124

[BCP, p. 781]


1 If the LORD had not been on our side, *

let Israel now say;

2 If the LORD had not been on our side, *

when enemies rose up against us;

3 Then would they have swallowed us up alive *

in their fierce anger toward us;

4 Then would the waters have overwhelmed us *

and the torrent gone over us;

5 Then would the raging waters *

have gone right over us.

6 Blessed be the LORD! *

he has not given us over to be a prey for their teeth.

7 We have escaped like a bird from the snare of the fowler; *

the snare is broken, and we have escaped.

8 Our help is in the Name of the LORD, *

the maker of heaven and earth.


Psalm 125

[BCP, p. 781]


1 Those who trust in the LORD are like Mount Zion, *

which cannot be moved, but stands fast for ever.

2 The hills stand about Jerusalem; *

so does the LORD stand round about his people, from this time forth for evermore.

3 The scepter of the wicked shall not hold sway over the land allotted to the just, *

so that the just shall not put their hands to evil.

4 Show your goodness, O LORD, to those who are good *

and to those who are true of heart.

5 As for those who turn aside to crooked ways, the LORD will lead them away with the evildoers; *

but peace be upon Israel.


Psalm 126

[BCP, p. 782]


1 When the LORD restored the fortunes of Zion, *

then were we like those who dream.

2 Then was our mouth filled with laughter, *

and our tongue with shouts of joy.

3 Then they said among the nations, *

"The LORD has done great things for them."

4 The LORD has done great things for us, *

and we are glad indeed.

5 Restore our fortunes, O LORD, *

like the watercourses of the Negev.

6 Those who sowed with tears *

will reap with songs of joy.

7 Those who go out weeping, carrying the seed, *

will come again with joy, shouldering their sheaves.


Psalm 127

[BCP, p. 782]


1 Unless the LORD builds the house, *

their labor is in vain who build it.

2 Unless the LORD watches over the city, *

in vain the watchman keeps his vigil.

3 It is in vain that you rise so early and go to bed so late; *

vain, too, to eat the bread of toil, for he gives to his beloved sleep.

4 Children are a heritage from the LORD, *

and the fruit of the womb is a gift.

5 Like arrows in the hand of a warrior *

are the children of one's youth.

6 Happy is the man who has his quiver full of them! *

he shall not be put to shame when he contends with his enemies in the gate.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons


A reading from Luke (18:31-43)


Then he took the twelve aside and said to them, "See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished. For he will be handed over to the Gentiles; and he will be mocked and insulted and spat upon. After they have flogged him, they will kill him, and on the third day he will rise again." But they understood nothing about all these things; in fact, what he said was hidden from them, and they did not grasp what was said. As he approached Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. When he heard a crowd going by, he asked what was happening. They told him, "Jesus of Nazareth is passing by." Then he shouted, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" Those who were in front sternly ordered him to be quiet; but he shouted even more loudly, "Son of David, have mercy on me!" Jesus stood still and ordered the man to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, "What do you want me to do for you?" He said, "Lord, let me see again." Jesus said to him, "Receive your sight; your faith has saved you." Immediately he regained his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, praised God.


The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.


The Song of Mary

[BCP, p. 119; Luke 1:46-55]


My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; * for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant. From this day all generations will call me blessed: * the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name. He has mercy on those who fear him * in every generation. He has shown the strength of his arm, * he has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, * and has lifted up the lowly. He has filled the hungry with good things, * and the rich he has sent away empty. He has come to the help of his servant Israel, * for he has remembered his promise of mercy, The promise he made to our fathers, * to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


A Reading from Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018

November 24: Catherine of Alexandria, Barbara of Nicomedia, and Margaret of Antioch, Martyrs, c. 300 (p. 521)]


Catherine of Alexandria, Barbara of Nicomedia, and Margaret of Antioch were three of the most popular ancient and medieval saints, and they even attracted widespread devotion among Anglicans after the Reformation. In the mid-twentieth century, however, their popularity waned significantly as doubts about this historicity grew. The lives of all three virgin martyrs contain many elements that are indisputably either legendary or metaphorical. In recent decades, however, martyrdom accounts written in such a style have attracted increased scholarly attention as we have started to ponder the particular ways in which communities choose to remember trauma. It is striking, for example, that virtually no female martyrdom accounts include sexual violence, even though we know from other genres of writing that it was historically very common. Whatever is happening in these accounts, it is clearly not a straightforward description of the facts, but seems to be rather a recasting of trauma into something that one might actually want to remember and feel inspired by, and the kind of stories that one could pass on to one’s children. In the world of historical facts, we all know that instruments of torture do not spontaneously shatter and that dragons do not explode. (For that matter, we know that there are no dragons to begin with!) But if the purpose of such narratives is not to convey the literal truth of what happened, but rather to portray the unvanquished spirits of these early Christian martyrs in the face of trauma, then perhaps there may be a kind of truth behind the legends after all.


According to the life of Catherine of Alexandria, she was a young scholar and the daughter of an Egyptian government official who converted to Christianity as a teenager. When she rebuked the emperor for his cruelty in inciting persecution against the Christians, he summoned 50 of his best philosophers and orators to debate with her, but she won every single argument and many of them were converted to Christianity. The emperor then condemned her to be tortured to death on a spiked wheel, but it shattered at her touch. Finally, he had her beheaded.


Barbara’s life states that because of her beauty, her father locked her up in a tower where only her pagan tutors were granted access to her. From them she became highly educated and began to consider the nature of the physical and metaphysical world, and eventually decided that there was only one true God, and that it might be the God of the Christians. She had a third window added to her prison, and thus created place of personal prayer where she could contemplate the Trinity as the light moved across the three windows. When her father questioned this action, she professed her Christian faith to him and was executed.


The life of Margaret of Antioch recounts that she was the daughter of a pagan priest named Aedesius. Her mother died in childbirth, and so she was given to a Christian woman to nurse, and as she grew up she embraced the Christian religion. When her religion became known, she was subjected to severe persecutions, the most famous trial included being swallowed by Satan in the form of a dragon. The cross that she was holding in her hand irritated the dragon’s stomach, however, and caused it to immediately explode. Eventually, after prevailing through many trials, she was executed. Margaret was one of the most popular English saints, both before and after the Reformation. Many Anglican parishes have been dedicated to her, as has the women’s religious community the Society of Saint Margaret.


The Song of Simeon

[BCP, p. 120; Luke 2:29-32]


Lord, you now have set your servant free *

to go in peace as you have promised;

For these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, *

whom you have prepared for all the world to see:

A Light to enlighten the nations, *

and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.


The Apostles' Creed

[BCP, p. 120]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, his only son, our Lord.

He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit

and born of the Virgin Mary.

He suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried.

He descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again.

He ascended into heaven,

and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[BCP, p. 121]


V: The Lord be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.


Suffrages B

[BCP, p. 122]


That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That your holy angels may lead us in paths of peace and goodwill,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be pardoned and forgiven for our sins and offenses,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That there may be peace to your Church and to the whole world,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may depart this life in your faith and fear, and not be condemned before the great judgment seat of Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


That we may be bound together by your Holy Spirit in the communion of Blessed Mary the Bearer of God, Blessed Matthew our patron, Blessed Catherine, Blessed Barbara, and Blessed Margaret whom we commemorate today, and all your saints, entrusting one another and all our life to Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.


Collect of the Day: Proper 29

[BCP, p. 236]


Almighty and everlasting God, whose will it is to restore all things in your well-beloved Son, the King of kings and Lord of lords: Mercifully grant that the peoples of the earth, divided and enslaved by sin, may be freed and brought together under his most gracious rule; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: Catherine of Alexandria, Barbara of Nicomedia, and Margaret of Antioch, Martyrs, c. 300

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 522 (pre-publication)]


Embolden your church, O God, with the stories of your saints Catherine, Barbara, and Margaret, that we might face all trials and adversities with a fearless mind and an unbroken spirit, knowing that we are more than conquerors through Jesus Christ who strengthens us. Through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen.


A Collect for Aid against Perils

[BCP, p. 123]


Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.


Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.


Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.


The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.


A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.


The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Thanks be to God.


May the God of hope fill us with all joy and peace in believing through the power of the Holy Spirit. Amen. (Romans 15:13)


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