• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for May 19, 2020

Tuesday in the 6th Week of Easter (Rogation Day II)

Evening Prayer

May 19, 2020


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Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.


Note: We are again praying with Rite II (contemporary English) language during the season of Easter. This is our normal pattern at St. Matthew's. It reminds us that we can speak to God with our ordinary, everyday language.

This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979) and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.




Evening Prayer, Rite II

[BCP, p. 117]



Thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

[1 Corinthians 15:57; BCP, p. 77]



The Invitatory and Psalter

[BCP, p. 117]


V: O God, make speed to save us. R: O Lord, make haste to help us.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.

Alleluia!


O Gracious Light

[BCP, p. 118]


O gracious light, pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven, O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed!

Now as we come to the setting of the sun, and our eyes behold the vesper light, we sing your praises, O God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

You are worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices, O Son of God, O Giver of life, and to be glorified through all the worlds.


The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 78: Part IIQuoties exacerbaverunt

40   How often the people disobeyed him in the wilderness *

and offended him in the desert!

41   Again and again they tempted God *

and provoked the Holy One of Israel.

42   They did not remember his power *

in the day when he ransomed them from the enemy;

43   How he wrought his signs in Egypt *

and his omens in the field of Zoan.

44   He turned their rivers into blood, *

so that they could not drink of their streams.

45   He sent swarms of flies among them, which ate them up, *

and frogs, which destroyed them.

46   He gave their crops to the caterpillar, *

the fruit of their toil to the locust.

47   He killed their vines with hail *

and their sycamores with frost.

48   He delivered their cattle to hailstones *

and their livestock to hot thunderbolts.

49   He poured out upon them his blazing anger: *

fury, indignation, and distress, a troop of destroying angels.

50   He gave full rein to his anger; he did not spare their souls from death; *

but delivered their lives to the plague.

51   He struck down all the firstborn of Egypt, *

the flower of manhood in the dwellings of Ham.

52   He led out his people like sheep *

and guided them in the wilderness like a flock.

53   He led them to safety, and they were not afraid; *

but the sea overwhelmed their enemies.

54   He brought them to his holy land, *

the mountain his right hand had won.

55   He drove out the Canaanites before them and apportioned an inheritance to them by lot;*

he made the tribes of Israel to dwell in their tents.

56   But they tested the Most High God, and defied him, *

and did not keep his commandments.

57   They turned away and were disloyal like their fathers; *

they were undependable like a warped bow.

58   They grieved him with their hill-altars *

they provoked his displeasure with their idols.

59   When God heard this, he was angry *

and utterly rejected Israel.

60   He forsook the shrine at Shiloh, *

the tabernacle where he had lived among his people.

61   He delivered the ark into captivity, *

his glory into the adversary's hand.

62   He gave his people to the sword *

and was angered against his inheritance.

63   The fire consumed their young men; *

there were no wedding songs for their maidens.

64   Their priests fell by the sword, *

and their widows made no lamentation.

65   Then the LORD woke as though from sleep, *

like a warrior refreshed with wine.

66   He struck his enemies on the backside *

and put them to perpetual shame.

67   He rejected the tent of Joseph *

and did not choose the tribe of Ephraim;

68   He chose instead the tribe of Judah *

and Mount Zion, which he loved.

69   He built his sanctuary like the heights of heaven, *

like the earth which he founded for ever.

70   He chose David his servant, *

and took him away from the sheepfolds.

71   He brought him from following the ewes, *

to be a shepherd over Jacob his people and over Israel his inheritance.

72   So he shepherded them with a faithful and true heart *

and guided them with the skillfulness of his hands.


Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons


A reading from 1 Timothy (2:1-6)

1 First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for everyone, 2 for kings and all who are in high positions, so that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and dignity. 3 This is right and is acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, 4 who desires everyone to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. 5 For there is one God; there is also one mediator between God and humankind, Christ Jesus, himself human, 6  who gave himself a ransom for all —this was attested at the right time.


The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.


The Song of Mary

[BCP, p. 119; Luke 1:46-55]


My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; * for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant. From this day all generations will call me blessed: * the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name. He has mercy on those who fear him * in every generation. He has shown the strength of his arm, * he has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, * and has lifted up the lowly. He has filled the hungry with good things, * and the rich he has sent away empty. He has come to the help of his servant Israel, * for he has remembered his promise of mercy, The promise he made to our fathers, * to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


A Reading from [["non-biblical Christian literature" (BCP, p. 142)]]


The Song of Simeon

[BCP, p. 120; Luke 2:29-32]


Lord, you now have set your servant free *

to go in peace as you have promised;

For these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, *

whom you have prepared for all the world to see:

A Light to enlighten the nations, *

and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, * and will be forever. Amen.


The Apostles' Creed

[BCP, p. 120]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, his only son, our Lord.

He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit

and born of the Virgin Mary.

He suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried.

He descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again.

He ascended into heaven,

and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

He will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[BCP, p. 121]


V: The Lord be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.


Suffrages A

[BCP, p. 121]


V.    Show us your mercy, O Lord;

R.    And grant us your salvation.

V.    Clothe your ministers with righteousness;

R.    Let your people sing with joy.

V.    Give peace, O Lord, in all the world;

R.    For only in you can we live in safety.

V.    Lord, keep this nation under your care;

R.    And guide us in the way of justice and truth.

V.    Let your way be known upon earth;

R.    Your saving health among all nations.

V.    Let not the needy, O Lord, be forgotten;

R.    Nor the hope of the poor be taken away.

V.    Create in us clean hearts, O God;

R.    And sustain us with your Holy Spirit.


Collect of the Day: Sixth Sunday of Easter

[BCP, p. 225]


O God, you have prepared for those who love you such good things as surpass our understanding: Pour into our hearts such love towards you, that we, loving you in all things and above all things, may obtain your promises, which exceed all that we can desire; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: Rogation Day II - For Commerce and Industry

[BCP, p. 225]


Almighty God, whose Son Jesus Christ in his earthly life shared our toil and hallowed our labor: Be present with your people where they work; make those who carry on the industries and commerce of this land responsive to your will; and give to us all a pride in what we do, and a just return for our labor; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


Collect of the Day: St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury (d. 988)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018 [pre-publication], p. 232]


Direct your Church, O Lord, into the beauty of holiness, that, following the good example of your servant Dunstan, we may honor your Son Jesus Christ with our lips and in our lives; to the glory of his Name, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


A Collect for Aid against Perils

[BCP, p. 123]


Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.


Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


O God and Father of all, whom the whole heavens adore: Let the whole earth also worship you, all nations obey you, all tongues confess and bless you, and men and women everywhere love you and serve you in peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.


Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.


The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.


A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.


The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Alleluia, alleluia! Thanks be to God. Alleluia, alleluia!


Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine: Glory to him from generation to generation in the Church, and in Christ Jesus for ever and ever. Amen. (Ephesians 3:20)



About Today's Commemoration


May 19: St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury (d. 988)

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018 [pre-publication], p. 232]


In the ninth century, under King Alfred the Great, England had achieved considerable military, political, cultural, and even some ecclesiastical recovery from the Viking invasions. It was not until the following century, however, that there was a revival of monasticism and spirituality. In that, the leading figure was Dunstan.


Dunstan was born about 909 into a family with royal connections. He became a monk and, in 943, was made Abbot of Glastonbury. During a year-long political exile in Flanders, he encountered the vigorous currents of the Benedictine monastic revival. King Edgar recalled Dunstan to England in 957, appointed him Bishop of Worcester, then of London; and, in 960, named him Archbishop of Canterbury. Together with his former pupils, Bishops Aethelwold of Winchester and Oswald of Worcester (later of York), Dunstan was a leader of the English church. All three have been described as “contemplatives in action”—bringing the fruits of their monastic prayer life to the immediate concerns of church and state. They sought better education and discipline among the clergy, the end of landed family interest in the church, the restoration of former monasteries and the establishment of new ones, a revival of monastic life for women, and a more elaborate and carefully ordered liturgical worship.


This reform movement was set forth in the “Monastic Agreement,” a common code for English monasteries drawn up by Aethelwold about 970, primarily under the inspiration of Dunstan. It called for continual intercession for the royal house, and emphasized the close tie between the monasteries and the crown.


The long-term effects of this tenth-century reform resulted in the retention of two peculiarly English institutions: the “monastic cathedral,” and the Celtic pattern of “monk-bishops.”


Dunstan is also reputed to have been an expert craftsman. His name is especially associated with the working of metals and the casting of bells, and he was regarded as the patron saint of those crafts. He died at Canterbury in 988.

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