• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for May 18, 2021

Tuesday in the Seventh Week of Easter

Evening Prayer

May 18, 2021


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Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.




Evening Prayer

Enriching Our Worship 1 and Book of Common Prayer



You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.

[Acts 1:8; BCP, p. 77]



The Invitatory and Psalter

[EOW1, p. 20]


V: O God, be not far from us. R: Come quickly to help us, O God.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Alleluia!



Light of the World (Phos hilaron)

[EOW1, p. 23]


Light of the world, in grace and beauty,

Mirror of God’s eternal face,

Transparent flame of love’s free duty,

You bring salvation to our race.

Now, as we see the lights of evening,

We raise our voice in hymns of praise;

Worthy are you of endless blessing,

Sun of our night, lamp of our days.



The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 94

[BCP, p. 722]


1 O LORD God of vengeance, *

O God of vengeance, show yourself.

2 Rise up, O Judge of the world; *

give the arrogant their just deserts.

3 How long shall the wicked, O LORD, *

how long shall the wicked triumph?

4 They bluster in their insolence; *

all evildoers are full of boasting.

5 They crush your people, O LORD, *

and afflict your chosen nation.

6 They murder the widow and the stranger *

and put the orphans to death.

7 Yet they say, "The LORD does not see, *

the God of Jacob takes no notice."

8 Consider well, you dullards among the people; *

when will you fools understand?

9 He that planted the ear, does he not hear? *

he that formed the eye, does he not see?

10 He who admonishes the nations, will he not punish? *

he who teaches all the world, has he no knowledge?

11 The LORD knows our human thoughts; *

how like a puff of wind they are.

12 Happy are they whom you instruct, O Lord! *

whom you teach out of your law;

13 To give them rest in evil days, *

until a pit is dug for the wicked.

14 For the LORD will not abandon his people, *

nor will he forsake his own.

15 For judgment will again be just, *

and all the true of heart will follow it.

16 Who rose up for me against the wicked? *

who took my part against the evildoers?

17 If the LORD had not come to my help, *

I should soon have dwelt in the land of silence.

18 As often as I said, "My foot has slipped, " *

your love, O LORD, upheld me.

19 When many cares fill my mind, *

your consolations cheer my soul.

20 Can a corrupt tribunal have any part with you, *

one which frames evil into law?

21 They conspire against the life of the just *

and condemn the innocent to death.

22 But the LORD has become my stronghold, *

and my God the rock of my trust.

23 He will turn their wickedness back upon them and destroy them in their own malice; *

the LORD our God will destroy them.


Psalm 95

[BCP, p. 724]


1 Come, let us sing to the LORD; *

let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation.

2 Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving *

and raise a loud shout to him with psalms.

3 For the LORD is a great God, *

and a great King above all gods.

4 In his hand are the caverns of the earth, *

and the heights of the hills are his also.

5 The sea is his, for he made it, *

and his hands have molded the dry land.

6 Come, let us bow down, and bend the knee, *

and kneel before the LORD our Maker.

7 For he is our God, and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand. *

Oh, that today you would hearken to his voice!

8 Harden not your hearts, as your forebears did in the wilderness, *

at Meribah, and on that day at Massah, when they tempted me.

9 They put me to the test, *

though they had seen my works.

10 Forty years long I detested that generation and said, *

This people are wayward in their hearts; they do not know my ways."

11 So I swore in my wrath, *

"They shall not enter into my rest."


Praise to the Holy and Undivided Trinity, One God: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons



A Reading from Luke (10:1-17)


After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, "The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road. Whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace to this house!' And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, 'The kingdom of God has come near to you.' But whenever you enter a town and they do not welcome you, go out into its streets and say, 'Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet, we wipe off in protest against you. Yet know this: the kingdom of God has come near.' I tell you, on that day it will be more tolerable for Sodom than for that town. "Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the deeds of power done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes. But at the judgment it will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon than for you. And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? No, you will be brought down to Hades. "Whoever listens to you listens to me, and whoever rejects you rejects me, and whoever rejects me rejects the one who sent me." The seventy returned with joy, saying, "Lord, in your name even the demons submit to us!"


Hear what the Spirit is saying to God's people.

Thanks be to God.



Canticle D: A Song of the Wilderness

[EOW1, p. 32; Isaiah 35:1-7, 10]


The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad, *

the desert shall rejoice and blossom;

It shall blossom abundantly, *

and rejoice with joy and singing.

They shall see the glory of the Lord, *

the majesty of our God.

Strengthen the weary hands, *

and make firm the feeble knees.

Say to the anxious, “Be strong, do not fear! *

Here is your God, coming with judgment to save you.”

Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, *

and the ears of the deaf be unstopped.

Then shall the lame leap like a deer, *

and the tongue of the speechless sing for joy.

For waters shall break forth in the wilderness *

and streams in the desert;

The burning sand shall become a pool *

and the thirsty ground, springs of water.

The ransomed of God shall return with singing, *

with everlasting joy upon their heads.

Joy and gladness shall be theirs, *

and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



A Reading from Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018

May 17: Thurgood Marshall, Public Servant, d. 1993 [p. 229]


Thurgood Marshall was a distinguished American jurist and the first African American to become an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.


Marshall was born on July 2nd,1908, in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore and Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. Although he was pushed toward other professions, Marshall was determined to be an attorney. He was denied admission to the University of Maryland Law School due to its segregationist admissions policy. He enrolled and graduated magna cum laude from the Law School of Howard University in Washington.


Marshall began the practice of law in Baltimore in 1933 and began representing the local chapter of the NAACP in 1934, eventually becoming the legal counsel for the national organization, working in New York City. He won his first major civil rights decision in 1936, Murray v. Pearson, which forced the University of Maryland to open its doors to blacks.

At the age of 32, Marshall successfully argued his first case before the United States Supreme Court and went on to win 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the court. As a lawyer, his crowning achievement was arguing successfully for the plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, in 1954. The Supreme Court ruled that the “separate but equal” doctrine was unconstitutional and ordered the desegregation of public schools across the nation.


President Lyndon Johnson appointed Marshall as the 96th Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1967, a position he held for 24 years. Marshall compiled a long and impressive record of decisions on civil rights, not only for African Americans, but also for women, Native Americans, and the incarcerated; he was a strong advocate for individual freedoms and human rights. He adamantly believed that capital punishment was unconstitutional and should be abolished.


As a child, Marshall attended St. Katherine’s Church, one of Baltimore’s historic African American parishes. While living in New York, he was the senior warden of St. Phillip’s Church in Harlem and served as a deputy to General Convention in 1964. During his years in Washington, Marshall and his family were members of St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, where he was affectionately known as “the Judge.” He is remembered as “a wise and godly man who knew his place and role in history and obeyed God’s call to follow justice wherever it led.” Thurgood Marshall died on January 24th, 1993.



Canticle P: A Song of the Spirit

[EOW1, p. 38; Revelation 22:12-17]


“Behold, I am coming soon,” says the Lord,

“and bringing my reward with me, *

to give to everyone according to their deeds.

“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, *

the beginning and the end.”

Blessed are those who do God’s commandments,

that they may have the right to the tree of life, *

and may enter the city through the gates.

“I, Jesus, have sent my angel to you, *

with this testimony for all the churches.

“I am the root and the offspring of David, *

I am the bright morning star.”

“Come!” say the Spirit and the Bride; *

“Come!” let each hearer reply!

Come forward, you who are thirsty, *

let those who desire take the water of life as a gift.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Apostles' Creed

[EOW1, p. 41]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, our Lord,

who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,

born of the Virgin Mary,

suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried;

he descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again;

he ascended into heaven,

he is seated at the right hand of the Father,

and he will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[EOW1, p. 42; BCP, p. 121]


V: God be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.



Suffrages A

[BCP, p. 121]


V. Show us your mercy, O Lord;

R. And grant us your salvation.

V. Clothe your ministers with righteousness;

R. Let your people sing with joy.

V. Give peace, O Lord, in all the world;

R. For only in you can we live in safety.

V. Lord, keep this nation under your care;

R. And guide us in the way of justice and truth.

V. Let your way be known upon earth;

R. Your saving health among all nations.

V. Let not the needy, O Lord, be forgotten;

R. Nor the hope of the poor be taken away.

V. Create in us clean hearts, O God;

R. And sustain us with your Holy Spirit.



Collect of the Day: Seventh Sunday of Easter

[BCP, 226]


O God, the King of glory, you have exalted your only Son Jesus Christ with great triumph to your kingdom in heaven: Do not leave us comfortless, but send us your Holy Spirit to strengthen us, and exalt us to that place where our Savior Christ has gone before; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, in glory everlasting. Amen.



Collect of the Day: Thurgood Marshall, Public Servant, d. 1993

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 230]


Eternal and ever-gracious God, who blessed your servant Thurgood Marshall with grace and courage to discern and speak the truth: Grant that, following his example, we may know you and recognize that we are all your children, brothers and sisters of Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.



A Collect for Aid Against Perils

[BCP, p. 123]


Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.



Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


O God and Father of all, whom the whole heavens adore: Let the whole earth also worship you, all nations obey you, all tongues confess and bless you, and men and women everywhere love you and serve you in peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.



Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.



The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.



A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.



The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Alleluia! Alleluia! Thanks be to God. Alleluia! Alleluia!


Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine: Glory to God from generation to generation in the Church, and in Christ Jesus for ever and ever. Amen. [Ephesians 3:20,21]



Credits: This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979), Enriching Our Worship 1 (1997), and other liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

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