• Fr. Guillermo A. Arboleda

Evening Prayer for April 20, 2021

Tuesday in the Third Week of Easter

Evening Prayer

April 20, 2021


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Want to pray on your own? Visit prayer.forwardmovement.org for many varieties of Daily Prayer in the Episcopal tradition.




Evening Prayer

Enriching Our Worship 1 and Book of Common Prayer



On this day the Lord has acted; we will rejoice and be glad in it.

[Psalm 118:24; BCP, p. 77]



The Invitatory and Psalter

[EOW1, p. 20]


V: O God, be not far from us. R: Come quickly to help us, O God.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Alleluia!



Light of the World (Phos hilaron)

[EOW1, p. 23]


Light of the world, in grace and beauty,

Mirror of God’s eternal face,

Transparent flame of love’s free duty,

You bring salvation to our race.

Now, as we see the lights of evening,

We raise our voice in hymns of praise;

Worthy are you of endless blessing,

Sun of our night, lamp of our days.



The Psalm or Psalms Appointed


Psalm 36

[BCP, p. 632]


1 There is a voice of rebellion deep in the heart of the wicked; *

there is no fear of God before his eyes.

2 He flatters himself in his own eyes *

that his hateful sin will not be found out.

3 The words of his mouth are wicked and deceitful; *

he has left off acting wisely and doing good.

4 He thinks up wickedness upon his bed and has set himself in no good way; *

he does not abhor that which is evil.

5 Your love, O LORD, reaches to the heavens, *

and your faithfulness to the clouds.

6 Your righteousness is like the strong mountains, your justice like the great deep; *

you save both man and beast, O LORD.

7 How priceless is your love, O God! *

your people take refuge under the shadow of your wings.

8 They feast upon the abundance of your house; *

you give them drink from the river of your delights.

9 For with you is the well of life, *

and in your light we see light.

10 Continue your loving-kindness to those who know you, *

and your favor to those who are true of heart.

11 Let not the foot of the proud come near me, *

nor the hand of the wicked push me aside.

12 See how they are fallen, those who work wickedness! *

they are cast down and shall not be able to rise.


Psalm 39

[BCP, p. 638]


1 I said, "I will keep watch upon my ways, *

so that I do not offend with my tongue.

2 I will put a muzzle on my mouth *

while the wicked are in my presence."

3 So I held my tongue and said nothing; *

I refrained from rash words; but my pain became unbearable.

4 My heart was hot within me; while I pondered, the fire burst into flame; *

I spoke out with my tongue:

5 LORD, let me know my end and the number of my days, *

so that I may know how short my life is.

6 You have given me a mere handful of days, and my lifetime is as nothing in your sight; *

truly, even those who stand erect are but a puff of wind.

7 We walk about like a shadow, and in vain we are in turmoil; *

we heap up riches and cannot tell who will gather them.

8 And now, what is my hope? *

O Lord, my hope is in you.

9 Deliver me from all my transgressions *

and do not make me the taunt of the fool.

10 I fell silent and did not open my mouth, *

for surely it was you that did it.

11 Take your affliction from me; *

I am worn down by the blows of your hand.

12 With rebukes for sin you punish us; like a moth you eat away all that is dear to us; *

truly, everyone is but a puff of wind.

13 Hear my prayer, O LORD, and give ear to my cry; *

hold not your peace at my tears.

14 For I am but a sojourner with you, *

a wayfarer, as all my forebears were.

15 Turn your gaze from me, that I may be glad again, *

before I go my way and am no more.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Lessons



A Reading from Luke (4:31-37)


He went down to Capernaum, a city in Galilee, and was teaching them on the sabbath. They were astounded at his teaching, because he spoke with authority. In the synagogue there was a man who had the spirit of an unclean demon, and he cried out with a loud voice, "Let us alone! What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are, the Holy One of God." But Jesus rebuked him, saying, "Be silent, and come out of him!" When the demon had thrown him down before them, he came out of him without having done him any harm. They were all amazed and kept saying to one another, "What kind of utterance is this? For with authority and power he commands the unclean spirits, and out they come!" And a report about him began to reach every place in the region.


Hear what the Spirit is saying to God's people.

Thanks be to God.



Canticle D: A Song of the Wilderness

[EOW1, p. 32; Isaiah 35:1-7, 10]


The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad, *

the desert shall rejoice and blossom;

It shall blossom abundantly, *

and rejoice with joy and singing.

They shall see the glory of the Lord, *

the majesty of our God.

Strengthen the weary hands, *

and make firm the feeble knees.

Say to the anxious, “Be strong, do not fear! *

Here is your God, coming with judgment to save you.”

Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, *

and the ears of the deaf be unstopped.

Then shall the lame leap like a deer, *

and the tongue of the speechless sing for joy.

For waters shall break forth in the wilderness *

and streams in the desert;

The burning sand shall become a pool *

and the thirsty ground, springs of water.

The ransomed of God shall return with singing, *

with everlasting joy upon their heads.

Joy and gladness shall be theirs, *

and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



A Reading from Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018

April 18: Juana Inés de la Cruz, Monastic and Theologian, d. 1695 [p. 193]


Juana Inés de Asbaje y Ramirez de Santillana was born the illegitimate daughter of a Spanish captain and a creole woman on November 12th, 1648 in the town of San Miguel Nepantla near Mexico City, Mexico.


Raised by her grandparents in Amecameca, Juana Inés established herself from a young age as a talented thinker and writer. She is reported to have learned to read and write by the age of three, to do accounting by the age of five, to compose religious poetry by the age of eight, to teach Latin to children by age thirteen, and to master Greek logic by adolescence.


Prevented from university studies in Mexico City because she was a woman, Juana Inés continued to study privately while serving as a lady-in-waiting to the Vicereine Leonor Carreto, who also served as Juana Inés’ tutor, confidant, and friend. By the time she was seventeen, Juana Inés was able to sit before a tribunal of theologians, philosophers, justices, and poets to defend her knowledge and skill, thus expanding her renown as a scholar and a poet.


Juana Inés spent a short time in 1667 living in a cloistered monastery of Carmelite nuns, but found the community’s discipline too severe to allow her academic and creative genius room to grow. In 1669 Juana Inés entered the monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome, a more relaxed community, and took the religious name Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Sister Joan Agnes of the Cross in English.)


Sor Juana Inés’ literary career blossomed in the monastery, which drew both the affirmation and ire of ecclesiastical and secular society. Her detractors insisted that a nun had no business writing about secular studies such as philosophy or natural science, while her admirers praised her concise theories and elegant prose. In the midst of a very public intellectual career, Sor Juana Inés managed to balance religious devotion and life in community. She is claimed to have said: “One can perfectly well philosophize while cooking supper.”


Giving into threats of official ecclesiastical censure, Sor Juana Inés stopped publishing her writing by 1693. Following her retirement from public intellectual life, Sor Juana Inés is reported to have sold her collection of more musical and scientific instruments, as well as her library of more than 4,000 books. Of her extensive correspondence and publications, only a few of her writings have survived but she is hailed by contemporary critics as a major figure in indigenous Mexican literature.


Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz died on April 17th, 1695 while serving her religious community during an outbreak of the plague.



Canticle P: A Song of the Spirit

[EOW1, p. 38; Revelation 22:12-17]


“Behold, I am coming soon,” says the Lord,

“and bringing my reward with me, *

to give to everyone according to their deeds.

“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, *

the beginning and the end.”

Blessed are those who do God’s commandments,

that they may have the right to the tree of life, *

and may enter the city through the gates.

“I, Jesus, have sent my angel to you, *

with this testimony for all the churches.

“I am the root and the offspring of David, *

I am the bright morning star.”

“Come!” say the Spirit and the Bride; *

“Come!” let each hearer reply!

Come forward, you who are thirsty, *

let those who desire take the water of life as a gift.


Praise to the holy and undivided Trinity, one God:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.



The Apostles' Creed

[EOW1, p. 41]


I believe in God, the Father almighty,

creator of heaven and earth.


I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, our Lord,

who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,

born of the Virgin Mary,

suffered under Pontius Pilate,

was crucified, died, and was buried;

he descended to the dead.

On the third day he rose again;

he ascended into heaven,

he is seated at the right hand of the Father,

and he will come again to judge the living and the dead.


I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the holy catholic Church,

the communion of saints,

the forgiveness of sins,

the resurrection of the body,

and the life everlasting. Amen.



The Prayers

[EOW1, p. 42; BCP, p. 121]


V: God be with you. R: And also with you. Let us pray.


Our Father in heaven,

hallowed be your Name,

your kingdom come,

your will be done,

on earth as in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

Forgive us our sins

as we forgive those

who sin against us.

Save us from the time of trial,

and deliver us from evil.

For the kingdom, the power,

and the glory are yours,

now and for ever. Amen.



Suffrages A

[BCP, p. 121]


V. Show us your mercy, O Lord;

R. And grant us your salvation.

V. Clothe your ministers with righteousness;

R. Let your people sing with joy.

V. Give peace, O Lord, in all the world;

R. For only in you can we live in safety.

V. Lord, keep this nation under your care;

R. And guide us in the way of justice and truth.

V. Let your way be known upon earth;

R. Your saving health among all nations.

V. Let not the needy, O Lord, be forgotten;

R. Nor the hope of the poor be taken away.

V. Create in us clean hearts, O God;

R. And sustain us by your Holy Spirit.



Collect of the Day: Third Sunday of Easter

[BCP, 224]


O God, whose blessed Son made himself known to his disciples in the breaking of bread: Open the eyes of our faith, that we may behold him in all his redeeming work; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.



Collect of the Day: Juana Inés de la Cruz, Monastic and Theologian, d. 1695

[Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, p. 194]


Almighty God, Source of all knowledge, we give you thanks for the witness of your servant Juana Inés de la Cruz in her fierce passion for learning and creativity. Teach us to be faithful stewards of our minds and hearts, so that, following her example, we might forever proclaim the riches of your unending love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Through Jesus Christ who, with you and the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.



A Collect for Aid Against Perils

[BCP, p. 123]


Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.



Prayer for Mission

[BCP, p. 124]


O God and Father of all, whom the whole heavens adore: Let the whole earth also worship you, all nations obey you, all tongues confess and bless you, and men and women everywhere love you and serve you in peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.



Offer your own intercessions and thanksgivings.



The General Thanksgiving

[BCP, p. 125]


Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.



A Prayer of St. Chrysostom

[BCP, p. 126]


Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting. Amen.



The Dismissal

[BCP, p. 126]


Let us bless the Lord. Alleluia! Alleluia! Thanks be to God. Alleluia! Alleluia!


Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine: Glory to God from generation to generation in the Church, and in Christ Jesus for ever and ever. Amen. [Ephesians 3:20,21]



Credits: This service is drawn from The Book of Common Prayer (1979), Enriching Our Worship 1 (1997), and other liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church and the scriptures are reprinted from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

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